Z-NET - Legend

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Image Description

There are several types of information displayed on this site. The legend identifies the outlines on the map, while the map label displays the code or description of the item. For zoning and land use policy, code definitions may be a little tricky.

For zoning, the Zoning Summary page gives descriptive information about each zone.

Some examples of the zoning label text (the bright blue label):

Note: In general, if the number is less than 100, it indicates the minimum required gross lot acreage. If the number is greater 100, it indicates the minimum required net lot square footage. For more information, refer to Section 22.52.100.


For land use policy (the orange label), the code definition depends on which area of the County it is in. The Land Use Policy summary has legends for each area, community or neighborhood plan area as well as for areas not covered by a special plan.

For example:



Legend Items

Zoning

Zoning regulates land use, density, setbacks, parking, lot coverage and building size, thereby providing a means to implement the County’s General and Community Plans. The overall objectives of planning and zoning are to protect public health, safety and welfare, to promote compatibility between various land uses and developments and to promote an attractive and well-planned community. Zoning data is for unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County only. Created during the Zoning Map Conversion and Integration Project (ZCIP), last updated September 19, 2006 (ZCO 2006-073Z).
For more complete information, see Title 22 (Planning and Zoning) of the Los Angeles County Code, check the Zoning Summary page, or stop by the office of the Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning, Room 1360 Hall of Records, 320 W. Temple St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. Phone: (213) 974-6411.

Land Use Policy

How communities use land within their boundaries is referred to as land use policy. Land use policy establishes the basic type and intensity of uses permitted by the General Plan for each land use category, including the overall maximum density for residential development and maximum intensity of development for commercial and industrial uses. Effective land use policy adapts to fast-changing environmental, social and economic conditions. The General Plan is the foundation for all the land uses that occur in the unincorporated County and provides the framework for how the County will plan for and address the numerous land use challenges it faces. The Land Use Element in the General Plan also utilizes short-term programs and long-term strategies to provide flexible and comprehensive guidelines for dealing with County land use decisions and future development scenarios.
Referred to as the General Plan, it encompasses the unincorporated areas (sometimes referred to as ‘islands’) not covered by one of the plans below. It was adopted by the Board of Supervisors on November 25, 1980. Last amended on July 19, 2005 (GPA03).

Altadena Community Plan - Community plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on July 10, 1986 and last amended on December 26, 1989 (SP87044).
Antelope Valley Area Plan - Area plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on December 4, 1986 and last amended on July 27, 1999 (LP93021).
East Los Angeles Community Plan - Community plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on June 23, 1988 and last amended on July 25, 2000 (LP00-2).
Hacienda Heights Community Plan - Community plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on October 31, 1978 and last amended on November 19, 1992 (LP91220).
Malibu Coast Plan - Also referred to as the Santa Monica Mountains Local Coastal Program. Adopted by the Board of Supervisors on October 7, 1986 and certified by the California Coastal Commission on December 11, 1986.
Marina Del Rey Land Use Plan - Specific plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on August 22, 1995 and certified by the California Coastal Commission on February 8, 1996.
Rowland Heights Community Plan - Community plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on September 1, 1981 and last amended on November 4, 1993 (LP92065).
Santa Catalina Island Land Use Plan - Specific plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on March 15, 1983 and certified by the California Coastal Commission on November 17, 1983.
Santa Clarita Valley Area Plan - Area plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on February 16, 1984 and last amended on December 11, 2001 (LP00211).
Santa Monica Mountains North Area Plan - Area plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on October 24, 2000 and last amended on October 23, 2001 (LP01088).
Walnut Park Neighborhood Plan - Neighborhood plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on September 24, 1987 with no amendments.
West Athens - Westmont Community Plan - Community plan adopted by the Board of Supervisors on March 15, 1990 with no amendments.

For more information, please check the DRP Legend Codes page or the General Plan (1980) Impact Analysis.

Community Standards District (CSD)

The Community Standards Districts are established as supplemental districts to provide a means of implementing special development standards contained in adopted neighborhood, community, area, specific and local coastal plans within the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County or to provide a means of addressing special problems that are unique to certain geographic areas within the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.
For detailed development standards for each CSD, please refer to the County Code 22.44 Part 2.

CSD Subarea

These are the boundaries for the Area Specific Standards within CSDs. Examples include Union Pacific in East Los Angeles and Lake Avenue in Altadena. Last Updated: 10/24/2008 (Baldwin Hills CSD).

Significant Ecological Area (SEA)

Significant Ecological Areas are those areas that have been determined to possess biotic resources that cumulatively represent biological diversity. SEAs are designated for purposes of protecting biotic diversity as part of the Los Angeles County general plan or the city’s general plan.
Additional regulations shall be applied to development located in an SEA, based on County Code 22.56.215: Hillside management and significant ecological areas–Additional regulations. More information can be found on the Department of Regional Planning website at the Significant Ecological Areas (SEAs) of Los Angeles County. Projects in an SEA are subject to review by the SEA Technical Advisory Committee.

Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area (ESHA)

Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Areas are mapped in the Santa Monica Mountains Coastal Zone area only. This designation affords the highest protection from future land development; only resource-dependent uses are allowed in ESHA.

Sensitive Environmental Resource Area (SERA)

Santa Monica Mountains Coastal Zone area only (North of City of Malibu, west of City of Los Angeles and generally south of Mulholland Highway). SERAs contain biological resources that, because of their special characteristics and/or vulnerability, require greater protection, and development in a SERA requires a heightened level of review to ensure that protection. Projects in a SERA are subject to review by the Environmental Review Board.
• Significant Oak Woodlands & Savannas
• Significant Watersheds
• Malibu/Cold Creek Resource Management Area
• Wildlife Migration Corridor
• ESHA (shown as a separate layer because of their significance)

Transit Oriented District (TOD)

Transit Oriented Districts are established as supplemental districts in order to promote transit-oriented and pedestrian-oriented development, to increase transit use, to manage traffic congestion, and to improve air quality. To achieve these goals, transit oriented districts are established to create and apply unique development standards and case processing procedures to geographic areas within an approximately one-quarter to one-half mile radius around specific light rail transit stations in unincorporated areas. See Los Angeles County Code 22.44 Part 8. Last Updated: 2/24/2005 (Hawthorne / Vermont Stations). For more information on the existing TOD, please check the TOD Location map.

Parcel Boundary

This layer has three sources of information:
• Actual parcel outlines for legal land ownership (Current as of June 2010).
• Parcel attribute information obtained from the ‘Tax Roll’. This data has detailed ownership information for each unique parcel (Current as of June 2010).
• Images of map book pages, which show a scanned map containing legal description information and lot dimensions. Refer to the Assessor’s Office of Los Angeles county for these information.
Please note that these sources are updated and maintained separately so that each of the above is a ‘snapshot’ at a given, but not necessarily the same; point in time.

Incorporated City

There are 88 cities in Los Angeles County, each with its own city council. All of the cities, in varying degrees, contract with the County to provide municipal services. The County provides some services for all residents, like public health protection, public social services, property assessment and vital records.

For more information, please check the following links:
• The City/County Organization website
• A list of the 88 incorporated cities in Los Angeles County with their incorporation dates
• The City Official Roster that provides the names and contact information for officials in each of the cities
• The Communities Areas within the City of Los Angeles and their Supervisorial District
• An Estimated Population of the 88 Cities (January 2010) in the County of Los Angeles
• The Map of the Cities and Supervisorial Districts in the County of Los Angeles.

Unincorporated Area

The unincorporated areas include more than 2,600 square miles outside of the 88 cities. Representing two-thirds of the County’s land and one-tenth of its population, the unincorporated areas have been grouped unofficially grouped into 137 non-contiguous areas. Some of these are as small as a few blocks of land surrounded by cities. Others are urban centers with more than 150,000 residents. Still others in the high desert cover hundreds of square miles and are sparsely populated. If it were a city, these unincorporated areas would be the third most populous in the state, after Los Angeles and San Diego.

For more information, please check the following links:
• The DRP Unincorporated Los Angeles County page
• The list of the unincorporated areas in Los Angeles County
• The Map of the Unincorporated Areas and Supervisorial Districts in the County of Los Angeles.


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